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Alexander Barton

Alexander Barton

Male - Aft 1572

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  • Name Alexander Barton 
    Born ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Alt. Birth Abt 1488  ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Alt. Birth 1500  St. Monance Parish, County Fife, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Name Change 1565  ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Charles Stedman 
    • On the death of Susan (Stedman) Barton, in 1565, Alexander applied to Queen Mary (1542-1567) of Scotland and was granted "arms of adoption" by which he was empowered to obtain the estate bequeated to his wife by her father, on the condition that he assume the name and arms of the deceased father. Alexander Barton thus became "Charles Stedman." In 1565 the children also changed their surname to Stedman.
    Name Charles de Barton 
    Name Charles Stedman 
    Alt. Death Aft 1572  St. Monance Parish, County Fife, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Aft 1572  ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Several Scottish sources give his name as Charles de Barton or Charles Barton. However, the 1858 Barton Stedman genealogy uses the name Alexander.
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      About 1540, during the reign of King James V (1513-1542) of Scotland, Alexander Barton was appointed Burgess of Edinburgh for life, Deputy Collector of Edinburgh, and Searcher of Merchandise on the shore of Leith.  His son John Barton was given similar appointment with and succeeding his father.

      Alexander Barton and his father were granted the freehold estate of Hall-Tacis, which he sold in 1557.

      Following his marriage to Susan Stedman, an heiress, he changed his arms to join his and his wife's. The joined arms (arms of alliance) denoted the alliance which Alexander and Susan had contracted by marriage. Arms of this character are to be borne in an "escutcheon of pretense" by those who have married heiresses, but the separate escutcheon is not allowed until the death of the father of the lady.

      Alexander and his wife Susan were the parents of three sons and 2 daughters. One daughter died young, and the other one married before 1565. The eldest son was Alexander.

      On the death of Susan (Stedman) Barton, in 1565, Alexander applied to Queen Mary (1542-1567) of Scotland and was granted "arms of adoption" by which he was empowered to obtain the estate bequeated to his wife by her father, on the condition that he assume the name and arms of the deceased father.  Alexander Barton thus became "Charles Stedman."   In 1565 the children also changed their surname to Stedman. It is said that in 1565, Alexander "seized in lands in Edinburgh and assumed Susan's name".

      In the attack on the city of Edinburgh, in June 1572, the English burned the house of Charles Studeman/Stedman at Cannongate Port, or Leith, the port city of Edinburgh.
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      See: http://www.electricscotland.com/history/nation/stedman.htm
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      The Scottish Nation (1863) by William Anderson, pp. 507-508

      STEDMAN, a surname adopted by Charles Barton, son of the celebrated Scottish admiral, Sir Andrew Barton. Charles Barton married Susan, daughter of Charles Stedman and his wife Janet Neilson of Leith. Susan was possessed of considerable property, and Charles, on his marriage, took the name of his wife, and his descendants continued it. He had several children. His eldest son, Alexander, died in 1593.

      Alexander's son, William, married Margaret Anderson, and died in 1606, leaving a son, Alexander Stedman, Kinross. The son of the latter, Robert Stedman, of the Milne Lead and Gala Hill, Kinross, and of Little Seggie and Ballingall, Kinross-shire, married Agnes, daughter of Michael Henderson of Turfhills, in the same county.

      Robert left three sons.

      1. James, the eldest, succeeded to the lands of Little Seggie, which became the designation of his family. He was also seized in the lands of Milnathort, Kinross-shire, in 1648. Born in 1598, he died in 1686. He married Euphan, daughter of James Dempster of Tillyochie, Kinross-shire.

      2. John. He succeeded to his father's property in lands and houses in Kinross. He married Jean Dempster of Tillyochie, and died in 1673.

      3. Robert. He succeeded to the lands of Ballingall, which became the designation of his family. He was twice married, and left issue.

      James Stedman of Little Seggie, the eldest son, had a son, the Rev. Robert Stedman, for 52 years minister of Carriden, Linlithgowshire. In the old churchyard of the parish there is a monument to his memory, erected by his relict, Sarah, daughter of Sir Alexander Ingles of Inglistown, in that county. He joined the protesting party in the Church of Scotland, and was deposed in 1661. Subsequently he was restored, and was the first moderator of the presbytery of Linlithgow, Nov. 30, 1687. Born in 1625, he died in 1701. He left four sons, Alexander, James, Robert, and John.

      1. Alexander, ordained minister of Beith, Fifeshire, in 1691, succeeded his father in Little Seggie.

      2. James, born in 1662, married Janet Bairdie, Linlithgow. He predeceased his father, without male issue. At the base of the public fountain in Linlithgow, there was, in 1843, a large tombstone of Dutch marble (removed from the burial-ground of Linlithgow Cathedral), with the remains of an inscription, "Here lyes the Body of Janet Bairdie, spows of Stedman," and the figures 67, supposed to be her age.

      3. Robert, born in 1667, like his ancestors, the Bartons, seems early to have been prepossessed in favour of a maritime life. He became the owner and commander of a ship which traded between Borrowstowness and Holland. He extended his voyages to Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, and, in course of time, became possessed of no fewer than 13 ships. He amassed considerable wealth, which he ultimately lost. He died in 1738. By his wife, Margaret, daughter of Edward Jossey of West Pans, East Lothian, he had several sons. Edward, the eldest, born in 1699, was minister of Haddington, and died in 1756. Alexander, the 3d son, born in 1703, and educated for the Scottish bar, was distinguished as a sound lawyer and profound mathematician. He joined the Pretender in 1745, and, with his brothers, John and Charles, was taken prisoner at Culloden. They all effected their escape, Alexander and Charles to America, and John to Rotterdam. Alexander settled in Philadelphia, where he practiced his profession with great success, and having made his peace with the mother country, was appointed a judge of the supreme court of Pennsylvania, March 19, 1764. On the declaration of Independence of the American Colonies, he returned to Scotland, and subsequently went to Swansea, in Wales, where he died at the advanced age of 91. His son, Charles Stedman, born in 1753, on the revolt of the American colonies, joined the British forces, and was placed at the head of the commissariat department. Soon after the battle of Brooklyn in 1776, he was made prisoner, and carried to New York. The rapid advance of the British army caused the Americans to abandon that city in haste, and he was released. In 1780 he was again taken prisoner, while commanding a foraging party in the vicinity of Springfield, Burlington, New Jersey, but made his escape. He was appointed aide-de-camp to Baron Linsingen, then in command of the auxiliary Hessian troops, retaining his commissary powers. Owing to the scarcity of provisions, a rifle corps of German emigrants was raised, to the number of 400, and, being placed under his command, proved an efficient foraging force. At the battle of Guildford Court-house, March 15, 1781, he was wounded in his sword hand, in single combat with an American dragoon, and was only saved from being cut down, by the appearance of a British light horseman, who slew his adversary. At the peace of 1783, he came to England, and retired on the half-pay of a colonel. He was the author of a 'History of the American War,' published in 1794. In 1797, through the influence of the Marquis Cornwallis, he was appointed deputy-comptroller and accountant-general of the revenue of stamps, an office created on the occasion. He died in 1812, and was succeeded in his office by his only son John, born in 1786. In 1813 the latter was appointed civil secretary at Gibraltar and registrar of the Supreme Court of Appeal, and in 1816 one of the judges of the Court of Admiralty there.

      4. John Stedman of Wester Baldridge, Fifeshire. Born in 1678, he was ordained, in 1699, minister of Dalmeny, Linlithgowshire, and, in 1710, translated to the Tron church, Edinburgh. He died in 1713. By his wife, Jean, 2d daughter of Rev. John Kinniard, minister of East Calder, he had three sons; Robert, Alexander, and John, and six daughters.

      Robert Stedman, the eldest son, born in 1701, entered in 1730, as ensign in the Scots brigade in the Dutch service, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was at the battles of Fontenoy and Rocroix, and the sieges of Dendermond and Bergen-op Zoom, and died at Breda in 1770. He left two sons, John Gabriel, born 1741, and William George, born 1748, both lieutenant-colonels in the Scots brigade, Dutch service. John Gabriel, the elder son, was infeft in Ernieside, Kinross-shire, in 1791. In 1796 he published a 'Narrative of a Five Years' Expedition against the revolted Negroes of Surinam from 1772 to 1777.' The same year he was appointed to the command of a British regiment of the line, then in garrison at Gibraltar, but was prevented by an accident from joining it, and died in 1797.

      Alexander, the 2d son, died at Jamaica, unmarried.

      John, the 3d son, born in 1710, was, in 1740, appointed surgeon to the North British dragoons, or Scots Greys. He afterwards practiced as a physician in Dunfermline, and subsequently settled in Edinburgh. Besides several medical treatises, he was the author of 'Laelius and Hortensia, or thoughts on the Nature and Objects of Taste and Genius.' He succeeded to Little Seggie in 1765, and married Peggy, daughter of Robert Wellwood of Pitliver, Perthshire. He died in 1791.

      Lieutenant-colonel John Gabriel Stedman of Ernieside had 3 sons. 1. William George, born 1784, who succeeded him in that property. He was a lieutenant in the royal navy, and was killed while boarding a French privateer of the island of Cuba. 2. Robert Adrian, born in 1790, lieutenant-colonel 1st light cavalry, in the East India Company's service, and C.B. He succeeded his brother in Ernieside in 1812. He was at the battle of Aliwal in the Punjaub, Jan. 28, 1846, and was mentioned with high praise in the dispatch of Sir Harry Smith, the commander-in-chief. He died at sea, April 12, 1849, on his voyage home, after having served 41 years in India. A monument to his memory is erected at Cawnpore by his brother officers. 3. John Cambridge, born in 1796, a captain 34th light infantry, East India Company's service, was killed in 1834 in battle in Burmah.

      Lieutenant-colonel William George Stedman had an only son, Lieutenant-general John Andrew Stedman, born in 1788, who entered the Dutch service as a cadet, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-general. On 17th and 18th June, 1815, he covered with the Dutch troops the right wing of the allied army, and the road from Mons to Brussels, under the command of the Duke of Wellington. He received several orders of knighthood, and was made by Louis XVIII., an officer of the Legion of Honour. He died in 1824. His only son, Charles John #William, became a naturalized subject of Prussia, and Baron de Stedman in that kingdom.
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      The Scottish Nation By William Anderson

      Stedman, a surname adopted by Charles Barton, son of the celebrated Scottish admiral, Sir Andrew Barton, a memoir of whom is given at vol. i. p. 257 of this work. Charles Barton married Susan, daughter of Charles Stedman and his wife Janet Neilson of Leith. Susan was possessed of considerable property, and Charles, on his marriage, took the name of his wife, and his descendants continued it. He had several children. His eldest son, Alexander, died in 1593.

      Alexander's son, William, married Margaret Anderson, and died in 1606, leaving a son, Alexander Stedman, Kinross. The son of the latter, Robert Stedman, of the Milne Lead and Gala Hill, Kinross, and of Little Seggie and Ballingall, Kinross-shire, married Agnes, daughter of Michael Henderson of Turfhills, in the same county.

      Robert left three sons.

      1. James, the eldest, succeeded to the lands of Little Seggie, which became the designation of his family. He was also seized in the lands of Milnathort, Kinross-shire, in 1648. Born in 1598, he died in 1686. He married Euphan, daughter of James Dempster of Tillyochie, Kinross-shire.

      2. John. He succeeded to his father's property in lands and houses in Kinross. He married Jean Dempster of Tillyochie, and died in 1673.

      3. Robert. He succeeded to the lands of Ballingall, which became the designation of his family. He was twice married, and left issue.

      James Stedman of Little Seggie, the eldest son, had a son, the Rev. Robert Stedman, for 5*2 years minister of Carriden, Linlithgowshire. In the old churchyard of the parish there is a monument to his memory, erected by his relict, Sarah, daughter of Sir Alexander Inglis of Inglistown, in that county. He joined the protesting party in the Church of Scotland, and was deposed in 1661. Subsequently he was restored, and was the first moderator of the presbytery of Linlithgow, Nov. 30, 1687. Born in 1625, he died in 1701. He left four sons, Alexander, James, Robert, and John.

      1. Alexander, ordained minister of Beith, Fifeshire, in 1691, succeeded his father in Little Seggie.

      2. James, born in 1662, married Janet Bairdie, Linlithgow. He predeceased his father, without male issue. At the base of the public fountain in Linlithgow, there was, in 1843, a large tombstone of Dutch marble, (removed from the burial-ground of Linlithgow Cathedral,) with the remains of an inscription, "Here lyes the Body of Janet Bairdie, spows of Stedman," and the figures 67, supposed to be her age.

      3. Robert, born in 1667, like his ancestors, the Bartons, seems early to have been prepossessed in favour of a maritime life. He became the owner and commander of a ship which traded between Borrowstownness and Holland. He extended his voyages to Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, and, in course of time, became possessed of no fewer than 13 ships. He amassed considerable wealth, which he ultimately lost. He died in 1738. By his wife, Margaret, daughter of Edward Jossey of West Pans, East Lothian, he had several sons. Edward, the eldest, born in 1699, was minister of Haddington, and died in 1756. Alexander, the 3d son, born in 1703, and educated for the Scottish bar, was distinguished as a sound lawyer and profound mathematician. He joined the Pretender in 1745, and, with his brothers, John and Charles, was taken prisoner at Culloden. They all effected their escape, Alexander and Charles to America, and John to Rotterdam. Alexander settled in Philadelphia, where he practised his profession with great success, and having made his peace with the mother country, was appointed a judge of the supreme court of Pennsylvania, March 19, 1764. On the declaration of Independence of the American Colonies, he returned to Scotland, and subsequently went to Swansea, in Wales, where he died at the advanced age of 91. His son, Charles Stedman, born in 1753, on the revolt of the American colonies, joined the British forces, and was placed at the head of the commissariat department. Soon after the battle of Brooklyn in 1776, he was made prisoner, and carried to New York. The rapid advance of the British army caused the Americans to abandon that city ill haste, and he was released. In 1780 he was again taken prisoner, while commanding a foraging party in the vicinity of Springfield, Burlington, New Jersey, but made his escape. He was appointed aide-de-camp to Baron Linsingen, then in command of the auxiliary Hessian troops, retaining his commissary powers. Owing to the scarcity of provisions, a rifle corps of German emigrants was raised, to the number of 400, and, being placed under his command, proved an efficient foraging force. At the battle of Guildford Court-house, March 15, 1781, he was wounded in his sword hand, in single combat with an American dragoon, and was only saved from being cut down, by the appearance of a British light horseman, who slew his adversary. At the peace of 1783, he came to England, and retired on the half-pay of a colonel. He was the author of a 'History of the American War,' published in 1794. In 1797, through the influence of the Marquis Cornwallis, he was appointed deputy-comptroller and accountant-general of the revenue of stamps, an office created on the occasion. He died in 1812, and was succeeded in his office by his only son John, born in 1786. In 1813 the latter was appointed civil secretary at Gibraltar and registrar of the Supreme Court of Appeal, and in 1816 one of the judges of the Court of Admiralty there.

      4. John Stedman of Wester Baldridge, Fifeshire. Born in 1678, he was ordained, in 1699, minister of Dalmeny, Linlithgowshire, and, in 1710, translated to the Tron church, Edinburgh. He died in 1713. By his wife, Jean, 2d daughter of Rev. John Kinnaird, minister of East Calder, he had three sons; Robert, Alexander, and John, and six daughters. Robert Stedman, the eldest son, born in 1701, entered in 1730, as ensign in the Scots brigade in the Dutch service, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was at the battles of Fontenoy and Rocroix, and the sieges of Dendermond and Bergen-op Zoom, and died at Breda in 1770. He left two sons, John Gabriel, born 1741, and William George, born 1748, both lieut.-colonels in the Scots brigade, Dutch service. John Gabriel, the elder son, was infelt in Ernieside, Kinross-shire, in 1791. In 1796 he published a "Narrative of a Five Years' Expedition against the revolted Negroes of Surinam from 1772 to 1777." The same year he was appointed to the command of a British regiment of the line, then in garrison at Gibraltar, but was prevented by an accident from joining it, and died in 1797,—                                   Alexander, the 2d son, died at Jamaica, unmarried. John, the 3d son, born in 1710, was, in 1740, appointed surgeon to the North British dragoons, or Scots Greys. He afterwards practised as a physician in Dunfermline, and subsequently settled in Edinburgh. Besides several medical treatises, he was the author of ' Laelius and Hortensia, or Thoughts on the Nature and Objects of Taste and Genius." He succeeded to Little Seggie in 1765, and married Peggy, daughter of Robert Wellwood of Pitliver, Perthshire. He died in 1791.

      Lieutenant-colonel John Gabriel Stedman of Ernieside had 3 sons. 1. William George, born 1784, who succeeded him in that property. He was a lieutenant in the royal navy, and was killed while boarding a French privateer off the island of Cuba. 2. Robert Adrian, born in 1790, lieutenant-colonel 1st light cavalry, in the East India Company's service, and C.B. He succeeded his brother in Ernieside in 1812. He was at the battle of Aliwal in the Punjab, Jan. 28, 1846, and was mentioned with high praise in the despatch of Sir Harry Smith, the commander-in-chief. He died at sea, April 12, 1849, on his voyage home, after having served 41 years in India. A monument to his memory is erected at Cawnpore by his brother officers. 3. John Cambridge, born in 1796, a captain 34th light infantry, East India Company's service, was killed in 1834 in battle in Burmah.

      Lieutenant-colonel William George Stedman had an only son, Lieut.-general John Andrew Stedman, born in 1788, who entered the Dutch service as a cadet, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-general. On 17th and 18th June, 1815, he covered with the Dutch troops the right wing of the allied army, and the road from Mons to Brussels, under the command of the Duke of Wellington. He received several orders of knighthood, and was made by Louis XVIII, an officer of the Legion of Honour. He died in 1824. His only son, Charles John William, became a naturalized subject of Prussia, and Baron de Stedman in that kingdom.
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      Historical and statistical account of Dunfermline, Volume 2 (1859),  By Peter Chalmers, pp. 303-308

      WARDLAW FAMILY.

      (Pp. 301-5, 556-7, 576.) -- Henry Wardlaw, styled at p. 302 Archbishop, was, I think, merely Bishop. He was nephew of Cardinal Walter Wardlaw, and, after being precentor of the Cathedral Church of Glasgow, of which his uncle was bishop, was raised to the episcopal office in St Andrews on the death of Bishop Stuart, which occurred after an episcopate of only six months.

      "Soon after his consecration, the Earl of Northumberland arrived at St Andrews, being banished from England by Henry IV., and was honourably and hospitably entertained by him. The earl left with him his nephew, Henry Percy, who, for the two following years, under the care of Wardlaw, was the companion of the only surviving son of Robert III., afterwards James I., till it was attempted to remove the latter, for his greater safety, to France, when he was captured on his way by the English fleet. In 1411 Wardlaw founded the university ; and in 1424 crowned James I. and his queen at Scone, in presence of the clergy and nobles. He is said to have erected the Gair Bridge over the Eden. He died in 1440, and was interred in the cathedral. During his episcopate, Besby and Craw, the two earliest of the Scottish martyrs, suffered by the flames of persecution --  the former at Perth, and the latter at St Andrews." *

      * Roams's Hist, of St Andrew*, p. 33.

      There is an old house in the Kirkgate, Dunfermline, opposite to the north gate of the churchyard, long known as the Old Inn, which is said "to have been the town residence of Sir Henry Wardlaw, treasurer to King James VI. and Anne his queen It was previously the property of the Marquess of Tweeddale -- as noted by me in the ground-plan, Plate No. I.; and there is a disposition of it from him and his son, Lord Yester, which I have seen, to a Margaret Anderson. It narrates that they obtained a decreet of adjudication in July 1698, against William Dempster, son and apparent heir of the deceased Eobert Dempster, late Chamberlain in Dunfermline, and against Barbara Dempster, only child of the second marriage to the said uncle Robert Dempster, and their tutors and curators, adjudging all and haill ane tenement of land, high and laigh, lying within the burgh of Dunfermline, near to the Kirk-style," &c. The deed is signed by Tweeddale and Yester. I have seen, also, another deed, of date 1777, when the property appears to have passed into the hands of Mr James Beveridge, writer, Dunfermline -- father, it is understood, of Mr Thomas Beveridge, one of the Depute-Clerks of Session. From the trustees of this Mr James Beveridge, Sir David Wardlaw of Pitreavie seems to have acquired the property by disposition, dated 9th and 12th December 1790; and Miss Jane Wardlaw, only daughter of Sir John Wardlaw, Bart. --  both of whom I knew while they resided in Dunfermline nearly forty years since -- made up her title to it, as heiress to her grandfather, in 1823 (on the first day of which year her father died), and sold it in the same year to the late Mr Taylor, grocer, Kirkgate. This amiable lady, whose married life was a very checkered one, died May 23, 1855 ; and I had the melancholy satisfaction of accompanying her remains to St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Edinburgh. Her husband, Andrew Clarke, Esq., late of Comrie Castle, in Culross parish, died at Whitby, Yorkshire, May 2, 1858. The still surviving representative of the Wardlaws of Pitreavie is Sir William Wardlaw, the 13th Bart., bom 1794, residing in Edinburgh.

      PITLIVER AND KEAVIL FAMILIES.

      (Pp. 158-9, 305, 528-30.) -- The Laird of Garvock, who had bought Pitliver from the Dempsters, made it his residence towards the end of the 17th century, in consequence of the burgesses of Dunfermline, who had a right to use the wood of Garvock for repairs, having cut a large portion of the trees after the great fire which took place in the town in 1624, detailed at pp. 270, 271, and 514, of first volume.

      There is the following notice of Pitliver as the property of the Welwood family, in the Dunfermline Register of Births and Baptisms for March 1761 : --  " Robert Welwood of Pitliver had a son born to him of his wife, Mary Preston, March 15, and baptised March 20, named James -- witnesses, Sir George Preston of Valleyfield, and Kobert Welwood of Garvock, Esq."

      There is another entry --  "September 1764, Mr Robert Welwood of Pitliver, advocate, had a son born to him of bis wife, Mary Preston, September 8; baptised 18th; named Andrew Moffat witnesses, Sir George Preston of Valleyfield, and Major Robert Preston." I shall give in the sequel a Genealogical Table of the Wellwoods and some other families in the parish, including the Stedmans, one of whom was an eminent medical gentleman, Dr John Stedman. I have been favoured with the following list of the latter's publications by Charles von Barton, alias Stedman, of Besselich Abbey, near Coblenz on the Rhine --  a very interesting gentleman, with whom I have had much pleasing and useful correspondence. Dr John Steedman or Stedman was his great-grand-uncle, first a surgeon-major to the regiment of the Royal Grey Dragoons, afterwards for years a physician in Dunfermline, and ultimately in Edinburgh. His published works were:                         

      "Osteology," 1 vol.;
      "Os non modicum de Oesophago exemptum, Edin., 1734" (Essays of the Edinburgh Society);
      "Thermometrical Tables and Observations" (Philos. Trans. 1751);
      "Letter to Dr Pringle" (Medical Observations by the Soc. of Physs. Lond. 1764);
      "Letter on the Epidemic Fever in the Country about Dunfermline in 1758 (Med. Obs. London, 1764);
      "On Tobacco, Opium, Emetics, etc." (Essays of the Edin. Soc. passim);
      "The Effects of Hyosciamus Albus, or White Henbane" (PhiL Trans. 1751);
      "Physiological Essays and Observations" (Edin. 1769,8vo);
      "On Triangles described in Circles, and about them " (Phil. Trans. 1775) ;
      "Of the Degrees and Quantity of Winds requisite to move heavier Kinds of Wind Machines " (Phil. Trans. 1777);
      "The Study of Astronomy adapted to the Capacities of Youth," with plates (Lond. 1796) ;
      "Laelius and Hortensia -- Thoughts on the Nature and Objects of Taste and Genius" (Edin. 1782, 8vo) ;
      "Horace's Art of Poetry Translated ;"
      "On the Constitution of the Roman Legion."

      It is supposed that after a long practice at Dunfermline, and by his treatises and books, he acquired his reputation, which he sustained till his death in 1791. This eminent Physician and Professor married Margaret (styled usually and in the parish record Miss Peggy), daughter of Robert Welwood, second son of Robert Welwood of Touch and Garvock, in December 1754, by whom he had four daughters, two of whom are remembered as visitors in the first Lord Meadowbank's house in Edinburgh. One of them, Susan, married Mr David Wardlaw of Netherbeath, who resided in Dunfermline, corresponding with an entry in the Marriage Register of Dunfermline, that "on July 31,1779, Mr David Wardlaw, in this parish, and Miss Susan Steedman, in the parish of Canongate, Edinburgh, gave in their names for proclamation in order to marriage, and being regularly proclaimed, and no objections made, they were married." There was of this marriage one descendant, Agnes, who was married to the late eminent physician Dr John Abercrombie, Edinburgh, who by his marriage, it is believed, obtained a very considerable fortune, which he bequeathed, as well as his own, to his family of daughters, one of whom, Susan, is married to the Rev. John Bruce, D.D., minister of Free St Andrew's Church, Edinburgh, proprietor of Netherbeath in this parish.

      A sister of Mrs Dr Stedman, Catherine, married the Rev. Sir William Moncreiff, Bart., minister of Blackford, from which marriage the late Rev. Sir Henry Welwood Moncreiff, Bart., and his eldest son, the deceased eminent Judge, Lord Moncreiff, were descended.

      Dr Stedman's second daughter, Jean, married Captain John Christie, brother of Admiral Alex. Christie of Baberton, in the county of Mid-Lothian, a property situated near Meadowbank, in that county, the estate of the present retired Judge, A. Maconochie Welwood, Esq., now possessed by Archibald Christie, Esq., son of the AdmiraL

      Charles von Barton, alias Stedman, after persevering inquiries in this country as well as on the Continent, in order to establish his claim to be ranked, not among the titled persons (noblesse titrée), i.e. baronets, viscounts, earls, marquesses, dukes, and princes, but only among such as are high and well-born gentlemen, anciently styled, "of gentle blood and arms," intimated by the particle "Von." meaning "De," before his name, and the junction of the two names, "De Barton, alias Stedman," was at last successful, and he has favoured me with the following extract from a Register of the Prussian Nobility, published by the Baron von Ledebur, Member of the Royal Court of Heralds, in which he is thus mentioned:                       

      "Stedman, that is, De Barton, alias Stedman. Parted per pale, dexter gules, 3 snails erect or, for Barton ; Sinister argent, 3 leaves of sea-holly thistle, conjoined proper, for Stedman. -- (Armorials of the Scots Heralds, Workman. Pont, Nisbet, etc., 1529,1542,1623,1704, etc) The pedigree, authentically proved, goes back to Radulphus de Barton, before 1189, probably of the same family as the De Barton in Bretagne and Normandy (gules annulets or). Admiral Sir Andrew, ob. 1511. Charles de Barton m. Susan Stedman, and assumed her name and arms, joined to his own, 1565. She was descended from Patricius St., Edinburgh, 1369. Several Sts. were authors. One branch was since 1729 in Holland -- viz., Robert, Lieut-Colonel, Scots Brigade, service of the States-General of Holland, ob. 1770 ; George, Major, same Brigade, ob. 1807 ; Andrew, Lieut.-general in the Dutch army, ob. 1833. His son Charles, acknowledged as a Prussian nobleman, Member of the Rhenish States. Formerly Barton, Fryton, Whenby (Yorkshire); Over Barnton, Barnbougle (Edinburgh) ; Dalfibble (Dumfries); Bothill (Berwick); Earnieside (Perth); Seggy; now Whinfield, Ballingall, Drumlochran, Fruix (Kinross); Bellevue (Suffolk); also at Bath (Somerset); in the Rhenish Province, Besselich (Coblenz)."

      The acknowledgment was granted to him by right. The heralds addressed him immediately "High and well-born gentleman," and he was liable to no expense of the legal forms for the adoption of the particle "Von," or "De," before his name, and the junction of the two names, "de Barton, alias Stedman."

      Besides the acknowledgment of nobility for himself and his family in Prussia by the King's Archivists and Heralds at Berlin, for the reason of his pedigree being proved by more than sufficient authentic documents, his arms are exhibited as well in the oldest registers of the Lord Lyon's Office, Edinburgh, as in the system of Heraldry, edited 1704, by Alexander Nisbet, under the patronage of the last Scottish Parliament.

      As for the arms, it is supposed that the family of Barton is the same as exists in Normandy, where they bear gules (red shield) with annulets or (gold) on it. The Yorkshire Bartons came to Scotland after a contest with Edward III.; and in 1511 Sir Andrew Barton is found bearing gules, three house-snails, or, the house-snails having probably arisen from the annulets being sometimes represented merely as rolled shells, without the animals issuing from them. They are erect in the books of the Lord Lyon, and creeping, as seen on the seal and monument of Rev. Robert Stedman, minister of Carriden, Co. Linlithgow, who obiit there 1701. His monument, with his arms carved in stone, was erected by his widow, Sarah, daur. of Sir Alexander Inglis of Inglis Town, Co. Linlithgow, Knt. She ob. 1720.

      To the latter belongs the motto, "Cuncta mea caecum."

      "There is no legal authority," Von Barton thinks, "for the motto," and he suspects it to be "a corruption for 'cunctare mecum ' (delay with me), as the heraldic meaning of snails is notoriously delaying; neither having the beggars' practice of carrying all their luggage on their back, nor the satirical allusion of the Netherland gueuses with their 'Besace,' arisen 1566."

      "About the same year Charles de Barton," he adds, "married Susan Stedman, Edinburgh ; and as she appears to have been an heiress, Charles took her name, whilst his own fell into oblivion, for some good reason, I believe, as the English destroyed the house of John de Barton at Leith. The Stedmans must have borne a coat-of-arms, argent, three leaves of sea-holly thistle, conjoined proper (green). Charles blended both the shields, and bore argent two house-snails, purpure in chief and three leaves of sea-holly thistle in base. Other Stedmans kept the three snails azure, on a field argent, and a fesse vert for their difference." The writer further says, that "he would be very happy to know exactly to what persons, about anno 1600 (Tim. Pont) and 1704 (Alex. Nisbet), these arms belonged"

      In the large sheet of his printed illuminated pedigree, a copy of which he was kind enough to send me, there are all the authenticated descents of his family ; of the names of Barton, Stedman (alias Steidman, Steadman), Wellwood, Moncreiff, Paton, Rolland, Moubray, Kinnaird, etc., with their properties in the parishes of Dunfermline, Kinross, Orwell, Fossaway, Cleish, Beath, Clackmannan, etc., as well as in the counties of Edinburgh, Linlithgow, and York. Vide second last note of Appendix.
      ---------

      Appendix, pp. 456-459

      The Stedmans. --  Besides the description already given of the armorial bearings of Charles von Barton, alias Stedman, there is, he acquaints me, in heraldic language, a crest on a rim or, with three pearls, dexter a flag, gules, sinister, an anchor and cable proper.

      The reason, too, he states, why the Stedmans dropped the name of Barton was, that Sir Andrew, who had authentic letters of reprisal, granted 1505, against the Portuguese, was accused of piracy by the English, who hated him for having conveyed Perkin Warbeck and his consort --  then styled the Duke and Duchess of York --  with the royal vessel, the Lion, in 1497. The English in 1545, under Lord Hertford, and in 1547 under Lord Clinton, burned down the houses of John de Barton at Leith, and Barnbougle Castle of Robert de Barton, who assumed the name of Moubray by authority of an Act of Parliament, passed 10th May 1527.

      Another work of John Stedman, M.D., who, as already stated, was a Physician in Dunfermline, and afterwards in Edinburgh, and of whose publications a list is given at p. 305, was "De Opii noxis et virtutibus, 1734." This eminent medical gentleman is not to be confounded with another, also of celebrity, Dr George William Stedman, Knight of Danebrog, President of the Royal Medical Society, Edinburgh, son of Robert Stedman and Martha Stedman, and grandson of Andrew Stedman and Jean Grey. This Dr George William wrote:                       

      De Scarlatinal Sequelis. Edinburgh, 1821.
      On the Arteries of the Neck. 1823.
      Of the Disease called Bouquet, in W.I. 1826.
      Contribution to Operative Surgery. 1832.
      A Case of Apoplexy, etc. 1827.
      A Case of Milky Urine. 1828.
      A Case of Sesanos. 1828. etc

      William Black, Clerk of the Admiralty, Dunfermline, who married Marion, third daughter of Rev. John Stedman and Jean Kinnaird, went over to the Low Countries in 1748, and was godfather to William George, grandfather of Charles von Barton-Stedman. He was descended, maternally, from the Earl of Wemyss, whose son or grandson was also a friend of Dr John Stedman, the Physician in Dunfermline and Edinburgh. The portrait of Dr John, painted in oil, was in the possession of the Earl. Mr William Black was also godfather to John Stedman, son of Dr John and Margaret, commonly styled Peggy Wellwood, with Mr Robert Wellwood of Easter Gellet, Advocate, Dunfermline, May 26, 1757, and to several other children of Dr John Stedman, who lived at Dunfermline 1754-61, and perhaps longer. Dr John, the husband of Margaret Wellwood, was the eighth of the children of Rev. John Stedman of Baldridge and Jean Kinnaird.

      I saw at Pitliver, in 1855, a beautiful little portrait, in cameo, of the Edinburgh Physician, Dr John Stedman. The countenance had a thoughtful, mild, firm expression, with high eyebrows and large forehead. The hair was turned back, curled at ear and behind the neck, like a judicial wig. There were ruffles on shirt-breast, a cravat, and a single-breasted coat with large buttons, and without collar. The vest had also large buttons, but smaller than those on the coat. An inscription bore " John Stedman, M.D., died 16 Aprile, 1791; Seton, pinx. Tassie F," all in capitals. Having informed Charles von Stedman of this, he requested me to intimate to Mr Wellwood the happiness which he would have in being presented with it -- a favour which the retired Judge politely complied with, and I had the pleasure of being the medium of its transmission.

      I may just add, on the authority of Von Barton, that Besace, at the top of p. 308, means a beggar's bag ; and the French word Gueuse, a beggar, a raggamuffin. The Governors of the Netherlands called the Nobles gueuses when they came in procession to beg for their right and for their free religion at Brussels in 1565 ; and the Nobles themselves wore from that time a medal, showing a beggar's bag and the motto, "True to the King, to the besace!" The whole party of Dutch fighting the Spaniards, from 1569 to 1612, bore the name of Gueuses.

      On the following page is an exact copy of the inscription on the tombstone of the late Dr John Abercombie, Edinburgh, which, on his account and that of his family still having property in the parish, may be suitable for insertion.

      SUSAN WARDLAW,
      Relict of D. Wardlaw, Esq.
      of Netherbeath,
      And
      Daughter of J. Steedman, M.. D.,
      Physician, Edinburgh,
      Died 17 October 1803,
      In the 47th year of her age.

      IN
      MEMORY OF
      JOHN ABERCROMBIE,
      M.D., Edin. and Oxon.
      Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons,
      Edinburgh,
      Vice-President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh,
      And First Physician to the Queen in Scotland.
      Born
      XII OCT. MDCCLXXX.
      From a life early devoted to the service of God,
      Occupied by the most assiduous labours,
      And distinguihed not more by professional eminence
      Thank by personal worth,
      And by successful Authorship on the Principles of
      Christian Morals and Philosophy,
      It pleased God to translate him suddenly
      To the life everlasting.
      XIV NOV. MDCCCXLIV.

      AGNES,
      Wife of JOHN ABERCROMBIE, M. D.
      Daughter of D. WARDLAW, Esq.
      of Neverbeath,
      Born 12 Aug. 1787,
      Died 25 Jan. 1835.
      Also
      JOHNINA MARY,
      Their Daughter,
      Born 30 Dec. 1825,
      Died 25 March 1829.
      ADAMINA, died 24 April, 1851.
      GEORGINA, died 10 May, 1855.

      At the end of the Appendix and Addenda will be found, along with the General Genealogical Table, No. I., another special one, No. II., of the Family of Preston of Valleyfield, in the vicinity of Dunfermline, who were ancestors of the first three Earls of Kincardine, a title now held by the Earl of Elgin.

      The ultimate representatives of the Valleyfield family are the lineal descendants of the marriage of Mary Preston, eldest sister of the sixth Baronet of Valleyfield with Robert Wellwood of Garvock (who died in 1791), including the descendants of the late Robert Clarke of Comrie, of the late Laurence Johnston of Sands, of the late John James Boswell, Advocate, and of the late Hon. Allan Maconochie of Meadowbank, Lord of Session.

      The pedigree of the male line of the Wellwood family, in the first Table, has been compiled from the "special retours for Fifeshire," from 1600 to 1750 ; from the particular "Register of Sasines for Fifeshire," from 1700 to 1740 ; from the Register of the City of Edinburgh; and from Parochial Registers, mainly Dunfermline, from 1579 down to the present century. The pedigrees in the remainder of this Table have been compiled from the best printed and living authorities.

      The pedigree of the family, "Preston of Valleyfield," has been compiled from "Douglas's Peerage," "Douglas's Baronage ;" "An Historical Account of the Senators of the College of Justice, from its Institution in 1532," by Brunton & Haig, Edin., 1832 ; and from the various parochial registers, chiefly Culross.

      For the pedigree of the male line of the Wellwood family, on the left side of Table No I., and for Table No. II., I am indebted to the Rev. R. W. MacGoun, M.A, Mbrningside, Edinburgh, who married one of the sisters of the Rev. William Colin Clarke, grandson of Robert Wellwood (who ob. 1820), and heir of entail to Valleyfield.

      Note HH, pp. 401 of this volume.
      ------
      p. xxv

      P. 305, Dr John Stedman is stated to have been made a Professor of the University of Edinburgh. This was believed at the time, on good authority, to be correct: but on subsequent inquiry it was ascertained that his name was not found in the list of Professors of the University, and accordingly the designation was afterwards dropped.
    Person ID I39051  Stedman Families of the United Kingdom
    Last Modified 6 Jul 2014 

    Father Admiral Sir Andrew Barton, Knight,   b. Abt 1466, Leith, Midlothian, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1511  (Age ~ 45 years) 
    Mother Miss [--?--],   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown, ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F14662  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Father Sir Robert Barton,   d. 1538 
    Mother Dame Elizabeth Crawfurd,   d. Unknown 
    Family ID F14576  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Susan Stedman,   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1565, ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Alt. Marriage Abt 1509  ____, Co. Fife, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. John Barton, of Bowton,   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1583
     2. Alexander Stedman,   b. Leith, Midlothian, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1593, Kinross, Kinross, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Susan Barton,   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1565
     4. David Barton, of Bowton,   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1583
     5. Christian Barton,   b. ____, ____, Scotland, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1596
    Last Modified 9 Feb 2010 
    Family ID F14661  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - - ____, ____, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt. Birth - Abt 1488 - ____, ____, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt. Birth - 1500 - St. Monance Parish, County Fife, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt. Marriage - Abt 1509 - ____, Co. Fife, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsName Change - Charles Stedman - 1565 - ____, ____, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt. Death - Aft 1572 - St. Monance Parish, County Fife, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Aft 1572 - ____, ____, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - - ____, ____, Scotland, UK Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth